OC Public Budget Workshop Slides FY 2005-2006 - ADA

RETURN TO THE PRESENTATION VERSION OF THE OC PUBLIC BUDGET WORKSHOP SLIDES FY 2005-2006

Budget Highlights

• Background

• State Budget Impacts

• Recommended County Budget

– Available Financing

– Comparison to April 2005 SFP

– Appropriations

– Positions

• Augmentations

Budget Highlights

Background

• Step 2 reductions

– 2003 Strategic Financial Plan

– Designed to save $11.5 m by FY 06-07

• Second year level NCC limits

• Second year revenue shift to State

– $27.7 m General Fund property tax

– $4.3 m OC Flood Control District

– $3.3 m Harbors, Beaches & Parks

– $1.7 m Redevelopment

– Library and OC Fire Authority exempt

Budget Highlights

State Budget Impacts

• Mandate Reimbursement five-year payback extended to 15 years.

• VLF gap loan $26.5 m

– May be paid back earlier than expected

• Mental Health services to special needs school children ($7 m NCC savings)

• In-home Supportive Services

– State funding reduced to minimum wage

• Road & street maintenance funds

Budget Highlights

Available Financing

• Property Taxes up 5.9%

• Vehicle License Fees up 5%

• Sales & other taxes up 2.9%

• Health & Welfare realignment up 2.8%

• Investment pool earnings rate 3%

• Operating transfers & other down 24%

• Public Safety Sales Tax up 5.4%

2005 Strategic Financial Plan

Budget Highlights

Comparison to April 2005 SFP

Budget Highlights

Appropriations

• Historical vacant position factors

• No base building general wage increase

• Retirement costs up 2.4% (use $11 m investment account earnings)

• Health insurance up 15%

• General inflation 3% (higher for medical supplies, fuel and construction costs)

Budget Highlights

Augmentations

• Multi-year format

• Rolled into base budget

• Restore level of service

• Expand level of service

• Impact of State Budget May Revise

Budget Highlights

Augmentations-all programs

Budget Highlights

Augmentations-Public Protection

• Probation

– Youth Leadership Academy

• 85 positions, $1 m NCC

– Workforce Planning-new classifications & responsibilities

• 32 positions, $1 m NCC

• Sheriff jail rotation program

– 0 positions, $1 m NCC

Budget Highlights

Augmentations-Health/Community Services

• Medical Services to Indigents

– Increase by $3 m from the general fund

• Mental Health beds

– Increase by $1.5 m from the general fund

• Social Services CalWIN system

– 50 limited-term positions, $4.2 m NCC

• Level funding for Human Relations Commission

Budget Highlights

Augmentations-Infrastructure & Environmental Resources

• Watershed/Water Quality

– exchange $1 m Flood funding for general funds

• Dana Point Harbor

– transfer $2 m from Harbors, Beaches & Parks fund

• John Wayne Airport

– 18 positions for maintenance, security, contract administration; replace contract and extra-help.

Implementation of

Proposition 69

in Orange County

Dean Gialamas

Director

Forensic Science Services

Orange County Sheriff-Coroner Department

Combined DNA Index System

Offender Sample Collection Goal

Implementation of Prop 69

• Orange County has been a statewide leader in collection and verification efforts

– One of the first counties to implement the voter approved mandate

– First county to bring criminal justice partners together to work out the implementation specifics within the county

– One of the first counties to obtain DNA Cold Hits under Prop 69 mandated sample collection

– Only County to use a data verification process, a process developed by the DA's TracKRS Unit

– Represented on State Attorney General's Implementation Committee

State Implementation of Prop 69

• First meeting - December 2004

– Purpose - to facilitate communication and cooperation between stakeholders

– Invited stakeholders included

– State Sheriffs and Chiefs

– Judicial Council and CDAA

– Crime Lab Directors

– CDC, CYA, Probation

– County Counsel

– Governor's Office

– Each County is to decide how to use collected funds

Implementation of Prop 69

• OC Implementation Workgroup formed in January 2005

– Brought core workgroup together to discuss critical implementation issues

– Purpose - to facilitate communication and cooperation between county stakeholders and determine how collected funds would be used

– Invited stakeholders included

– Sheriff's Department and Chiefs of Police

– District Attorney

– Superior Court

– Crime Lab

– Probation

– County Counsel

– CEO's Office

– Public Defender

Implementation of Prop 69

• CA-DOJ began kit distribution and collection training in January 2005

– The DA's Office coordinated the training efforts in Orange County

• By February 4, 2005, all OC law enforcement agencies were trained in DNA kit collection

• Expanded use of SciLAS, for tracking DNA kit collection and preventing repeat sampling

– The Sheriff's Department coordinated the collection efforts for in-custody and out-of-custody eligible persons

• By late January 2005, all in-custody samples were collected

• By March 4, 2005, OC Sheriff had submitted over 3,200 DNA kits (of the 12,000 received by DOJ)

• To date, have collected over 10,700 DNA kits under Prop 69

Implementation of Prop 69

– The Probation Department is responsible coordinated the collection of qualifying adult and juvenile samples from probationers not previously sampled

• Juvenile DNA collection procedure implemented March 7, 2005

• Department priority established for collection of DNA to insure all qualifying probationers are sampled prior to termination/expiration of probation

• Formed a "DNA Collection Team" to collect 12,000 adult DNA offender samples, check and enter data into SciLas, and conduct quality control on the DNA samples obtained.

What's in Store Next

• Countywide workgroup will finalize the OC Implementation Guidelines

• Address increased Probation workload associated with the collection of over 500 juvenile probationer samples per year

• Work with CA-DOJ to electronically submit collection data eliminating writing on DNA collection kit information cards and simplifying the verification process

• Prepare Sheriff and municipal police agencies for arrestee sampling in 2009

– Up to 15,000 per year in OC

• Prepare OCSD Crime Lab for increased DNA testing

Future Outlook

• Solving Crime

– Orange County one of the first in state to obtain cold hits from DNA samples collected as a result of Prop 69

• One attempted homicide case and 2 burglary cases solved

– Qualifying offender samples collected in OCSD Jail

• Building Infrastructure

– Improved collaboration between agencies

– Collection of palm prints from bookings

– Fund DNA Capacity enhancement of OCSD Crime Lab

– Fund DDA's and County/Local Investigators for Cold Hit Investigations and Prosecutions

• By 2007, expect to see about 200 hits per year

• By 2010, expect to see about 1,000 DNA cold hits per year

• Preventing Crime

– Repeat and violent offenders will be identified

– As DNA collection proceeds from all felony arrestees beginning in 2009 and as Crime Lab processes all felony crimes with DNA evidence, can reduce high volume crimes and some violent crimes

WATER QUALITY -

WHAT'S AT STAKE?

Larry McKenney

Manager, Watershed & Coastal Resources

Resources & Development Management Department

Water Quality - What's at Stake?

Water Quality - What's at Stake?

Infrastructure systems are vital for maintaining a HIGH QUALITY OF LIFE and for providing a FOUNDATION for a GROWING ECONOMY.

Infrastructure systems are EXPENSIVE, but can be used as part of the water quality solution.

Water Quality - What's at Stake?

Orange County's MYSTIQUE AND REPUTATION as a world famous tourist and living destination

Water Quality - What's at Stake?

SIGNS THAT AFFECT OUR

ECONOMY AND QUALITY OF LIFE

Water Quality - What's at Stake?

CLEAN WATER IS GOOD FOR BUSINESS!

Water Quality - What's at Stake?

CLEAN WATER IS GOOD FOR BUSINESS!

• Visitors traveling to Orange County for recreation or business generate REVENUE for business as well as JOBS and INCOME for our local residents

– Los Angeles County - 154,233 jobs - $6.1 Billion to workers in 2003

– San Diego County - 112,070 jobs - $2.99 Billion to workers in 2003

– ORANGE COUNTY - 79,539 jobs -- $2.23 Billion to workers in 2003

– San Francisco County - 50,879 jobs - $1.77 Billion to workers in 2003

– Riverside County - 62,915 jobs - $1.4 Billion to workers in 2003

Dean Runyan Associates, CA Travel Impacts by County

Water Quality - What's at Stake?

CLEAN WATER IS GOOD FOR RESIDENTS!

Water Quality - What's at Stake?

Water Quality - What's at Stake?

Water Quality - What's at Stake?

Water Quality - What's at Stake?

Water Quality - What's at Stake?

WATER QUALITY FINANCING STRUCTURE

Funding the County's Existing Program

TOTAL INTERNAL COUNTY EXPENDITURES FOR STORMWATER IMPLEMENTATION

FY03-04 $11.4 million

FY04-05 $11.8 million (projected)

Funding Sources:

– General Fund

– Gas tax

– Flood and HBP Funds

– Household Hazardous Waste Funds

– Permit fees

Water Quality - What's at Stake?

WATERSHED & COASTAL RESOURCES DIVISION BUDGET

FY05-06 $15 Million (projected)

Sources:

– Contributions from RDMD Funds

• Since its creation, WCRD has been supported by reallocating Flood, HBP & Road funds to WCRD on an annual basis

– City Cost-Sharing for NPDES Compliance Program

– Cost-Sharing for Watershed Activities

• Capital Projects

• Studies

• TMDLs

– Grants

Water Quality - What's at Stake?

• Costs are expected to increase

WCRD NPDES Countywide NPDES

Shared-Cost Contribution Total Expenditures

FY01/02 $1.5 Million $45.8 Million

FY02/03 $4.9 Million $59.3 Million

FY03/04 $3.7 Million $64.9 Million

FY04/05 $5.8 Million $72.1 Million

• State budget problems and the lack of dedicated funding sources continue to be challenges

• The Los Angeles Experience

Water Quality - What's at Stake?

Water Quality - What's at Stake?

• Continue to find the CAUSES OF THIS POLLUTION problem

• Improved science are important pieces of the water quality puzzle

Water Quality - What's at Stake?

• Continue to achieve COMPLIANCE with the Stormwater/Urban Runoff Regulations

• The Regional Water Quality Control Boards must be flexible enough when creating new or revised regulations, yet challenging enough to help us implement long-term, meaningful water quality solutions

Water Quality - What's at Stake?

• Focus on POLLUTION PREVENTION measures and efforts

• All design improvements on new or existing infrastructure projects must include a water

quality element

– The Natural Treatment System project is an excellent example of creative and meaningful community-friendly, cost-effective and beneficial solution

• Education and outreach efforts must be made to all stakeholders - residents, businesses and government

Water Quality - What's at Stake?

• Continue to ENCOURAGE COOPERATION AMONG ALL STAKEHOLDERS

• Cooperation will result in:

– Greater Economies of Scale

– Increased ability to address this problem on a REGIONAL scale

– Increased ability to implement long-term meaningful water quality solutions

Water Quality - What's at Stake?

Next Steps

• June 14-15 Budget Hearings

• June 28 Budget Adoption

• November 8 First Quarter Report

Resources

• Budget Workbook

• Augmentation Book

• Key Terms

• Department Contacts

• Internet www.oc.ca.gov

• Survey Form